California Has So Many Regulations They Openly Contradict One Another

Ahh, California!

The land of Nancy Pelosi, Barbara Boxer, Dianne Feinstein, Jerry Brown, Henry Waxman, Maxine Waters, and countless other fruits, nuts, and flakes…where they’ll fine you $500 for watering your lawn… and $500 for not watering your lawn.

From Yahoo! News: “California couple conserving water amid drought could face fine for brown lawn.”

A Southern California couple who scaled back watering their lawn amid the state’s drought received a warning from the suburb where they live that they might be fined for creating an eyesore – despite emergency statewide orders to conserve.

Michael Korte and Laura Whitney, who live near Los Angeles in Glendora, said on Thursday they received a letter from the city warning they had 60 days to green up their partially brown lawn or pay a fine ranging from $100 to $500.

“I don’t think it’s right for us to start pouring water into our lawn in the middle of July during a drought,” said Whitney. “We’re kind of in a quandary about what to do.”

The letter, bearing the official symbols of Glendora and its police department, came the same week that statewide water regulators passed emergency drought restrictions for outdoor water use. Those regulations, to take effect this August, require cities to demand cutbacks in water use, and empower them to fine residents up to $500 for overwatering their lawns.

Could there possibly be a better illustration that contemporary government is the problem? Predatory, contradictory, and inhabited by the criminally insane.

[See also: “Californians Ready to Leave Hotel California.”]

“Throughout the state, Californians are making serious efforts every day to cut their water use during this extreme drought,” said Amy Norris, spokeswoman for the California Environmental Protection Agency. “These efforts to conserve should not be undermined by the short-sighted actions of a few local jurisdictions, who chose to ignore the statewide crisis we face.”

That big earthquake to drop the state into the ocean can’t come soon enough. (With apologies to my dear friends who live there—I don’t mean that literally.)