Charged With Child Porn: Lamar Alexander’s Chief-Of-Staff’s Death Ruled Suicide

I posted about the arrest of Ryan Loskarn back before Christmas and how it might or might not be related to other interesting stories that have popped up in Washington DC. I wondered what we would find out as the investigation and trial proceeded.

Since dead men tell no tales, we might not learn much.

Loskarn’s body was discovered in his parent’s basement. Prosecutors and defense attorneys had agreed to give more time for filing an indictment—perhaps in hope of reaching a plea deal.

Thus reports the Tennessean. It also says:

In an unusual ruling issued in the case late last year, U.S. Magistrate John M. Facciola defended his decision to release Loskarn to his parents, citing measures taken to ensure that he would not have access to the Internet.

“I have prohibited the defendant’s use of the Internet,” he wrote in the two-page ruling. “I concluded, therefore, that the risk of his resuming the downloading of child pornography is not great.”

The memorandum did not, however, mention the risk of suicide.

That is an odd omission since Politico.com reports,

Federal prosecutors had argued against Loskarn’s release and said that he made statements around the time of his arrest that suggested he could be a potential suicide risk.

Did the judge ignore those warnings? Or is someone giving misinformation to Politico?

Rather than repeat the questions I asked when Loskarn was arrested (though they still bother me), I will leave readers with Politico.com’s own description of Loskarn’s connections in Washington DC:

Loskarn’s sharp and sudden downfall stunned Capitol Hill, given his reputation as a well-regarded and savvy operative who was close to GOP senators, powerful political aides and members of the media. Loskarn was arrested last month by U.S. Postal Service investigators on charges that he possessed and distributed child pornography following a raid by federal agents on his D.C. home.

Loskarn, a Maryland native who graduated from Tulane University in 2000, moved to Washington after college and worked his way through the House, including a stint with GOP Rep. Marsha Blackburn of Tennessee. He later moved onto the Senate, working with then-Sen. Jon Kyl (Ariz.), the No. 3 Republican at the time running the GOP’s messaging operations. After Alexander won the Senate GOP Conference chairman’s post in 2007, Loskarn joined the senator’s office and later moved on to become his chief of staff.

With Alexander up for reelection in 2014, Loskarn had become a trusted aide and was heavily involved in the GOP senator’s efforts to win reelection.

Lamar Alexander’s statement is quoted in the Tennessean: “For everyone involved, this is a sad and tragic story from beginning to end.”

I would think that, if there was a computer involved, that the investigation of Loskarn’s network could still go further. I wonder if it will.