Congress Is Fighting for the People against Obama’s Climate Change Hoax

Much of the media reporting on the global warming hoax summit in Paris┬ásounds like it is a foregone conclusion that a treaty will be imposed on the people by the exploiters that are known as their governments. But this Associated Press story suggests the Republicans in Congress might stop Obama’s attempt to get an agreement.

(Calling the treaty an “agreement” might sound like it involves an agreement with us. That’s the delusion they want us to believe. It is actually an agreement among world rulers to make our energy more expensive. The people don’t agree to anything; we just comply with orders.)

President Barack Obama is trying to negotiate a legacy-making climate change pact this coming week in Paris with one hand tied behind his back. Congress can’t even agree whether global warming is real.

Scientists point to the global agreement, years in the making, as the last, best hope for averting the worst effects of global warming. Obama has spent months prodding other countries to make ambitious carbon-cutting pledges to the agreement, which he hopes will become the framework for countries to tackle the climate issue long beyond the end of his presidency in early 2017.

But Republicans have tried to undermine the president by sowing uncertainty about whether the U.S. will make good on its promises. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., and other GOP leaders have warned other countries not to trust any deal Obama may strike; other GOP allies are working to nullify Obama’s emissions-cutting steps at home.

“Congress and more than half of the states have already made clear that he won’t be speaking for us,” according to a McConnell opinion column posted on The Washington Post’s website. He said it would be “irresponsible for an outgoing president to purport to sign the American people up” for a new climate agreement.

I have been horrified by how Republicans, given both the House and Senate in 2014, have betrayed the people who voted for them on many issues. But this time they seem to be genuinely opposing the President.

In the United States, the talks are entangled in the debate about whether humans really are contributing to climate change, and what, if anything, policymakers should do about it. Almost all Republicans, along with some Democrats, oppose the steps Obama has taken to curb greenhouse gas emissions, arguing they will hurt the economy, shutter coal plants and eliminate jobs in power-producing states.

Half the states are suing the administration to try to block Obama’s unprecedented regulations to cut power plant emissions by roughly one-third by 2030. These states say Obama has exceeded his authority and is misusing the decades-old Clean Air Act. If their lawsuit succeeds, Obama would be hard-pressed to deliver the 26 percent to 28 percent cut in overall U.S. emissions by 2030 that he has promised as America’s contribution.

Opponents also are trying to gut the power plant rules through a rarely used legislative maneuver that already has passed the Senate. A House vote is expected while international negotiators are in Paris.

Senate Republicans are working to block Obama’s request for the first installment of a $3 billion pledge to a U.N. fund to help countries adapt to climate change, a priority for poorer countries. What’s more, the Republicans running for president are unanimous in their opposition to Obama’s power plant rules; many say that if elected, they immediately would rip up the rules.

Dare we hope the autocrats will fail? Previous attempts to set up a global treaty have done so. There is room to hope and pray.