Congress Made Obama Big Brother

The Senate snuck a provision into a bill so that Congress made Obama Big Brother.

Obama-Big-Brother

This week, while we were distracted by the torture report and the Jonathan Gruber Show on the Hill, Congress fully empowered and funded some of the most controversial (and unconstitutional) practices of the NSA.

Justin Amash writes about how he caught wind of this on his Facebook page, along with his letter to Congress:

When I learned that the Intelligence Authorization Act for FY 2015 was being rushed to the floor for a vote—with little debate and only a voice vote expected (i.e., simply declared “passed” with almost nobody in the room)—I asked my legislative staff to quickly review the bill for unusual language. What they discovered is one of the most egregious sections of law I’ve encountered during my time as a representative: It grants the executive branch virtually unlimited access to the communications of every American.

On Wednesday afternoon, I went to the House floor to demand a roll call vote on the bill so that everyone’s vote would have to be recorded. I also sent the letter below to every representative.

With more time to spread the word, we would have stopped this bill, which passed 325-100. Thanks to the 99 other representatives—44 Republicans and 55 Democrats—who voted to protect our rights and uphold the Constitution. And thanks to my incredibly talented staff.

And here is the main content of Justin Amash’s letter:

Dear Colleague:

The intelligence reauthorization bill, which the House will vote on today, contains a troubling new provision that for the first time statutorily authorizes spying on U.S. citizens without legal process.

Last night, the Senate passed an amended version of the intelligence reauthorization bill with a new Sec. 309—one the House never has considered. Sec. 309 authorizes “the acquisition, retention, and dissemination” of nonpublic communications, including those to and from U.S. persons. The section contemplates that those private communications of Americans, obtained without a court order, may be transferred to domestic law enforcement for criminal investigations.

To be clear, Sec. 309 provides the first statutory authority for the acquisition, retention, and dissemination of U.S. persons’ private communications obtained without legal process such as a court order or a subpoena. The administration currently may conduct such surveillance under a claim of executive authority, such as E.O. 12333. However, Congress never has approved of using executive authority in that way to capture and use Americans’ private telephone records, electronic communications, or cloud data.

Supporters of Sec. 309 claim that the provision actually reins in the executive branch’s power to retain Americans’ private communications. It is true that Sec. 309 includes exceedingly weak limits on the executive’s retention of Americans’ communications. With many exceptions, the provision requires the executive to dispose of Americans’ communications within five years of acquiring them—although, as HPSCI admits, the executive branch already follows procedures along these lines.

In exchange for the data retention requirements that the executive already follows, Sec. 309 provides a novel statutory basis for the executive branch’s capture and use of Americans’ private communications. The Senate inserted the provision into the intelligence reauthorization bill late last night. That is no way for Congress to address the sensitive, private information of our constituents—especially when we are asked to expand our government’s surveillance powers.

[See also, “The U.S. Is Now An NSA-Run Police State.”]

So that’s it. The Senate and Congress empowered government agencies under the executive branch to intercept and collect everything they can. Everything that Edward Snowden blew the whistle about, and more, is now officially legal.

Let this sink in: They gave all that authority to Barack Obama. They gave all that authority to the man who has used the IRS and other government agencies to harass and terrorize his political enemies.

I will happily laud the heroism of Amash and the other dissenters. But, as an institution, Congress is simply an enemy of the American people. There is nothing else to say.

Thanks to the Week for a summary and the link to Amash’s Facebook post.