Credit Card Processor Drops Gun Shop for Selling Guns

The credit card processor Authorize.net, a subsidiary of Visa, has decided to drop one of its clients for being in violation of their service agreement. What was their “violation?” They sell guns. Something that could never be known just by looking at the name of the company:  Hyatt Gun Shop. Apparently, it’s the nation’s largest gun shop.

So, Authorize.net claims that Hyatt Gun Shop is in violation of their service agreement, which both parties signed over four years ago, by being a purveyor of firearms. Did the Authorize.net representatives just not know how to read back when they initially signed and agreed to the contract? What did they think the Hyatt Gun Shop sold? I wonder if they’d also have trouble figuring out what color Paul Revere’s brown horse was, or who lies in Grant’s tomb.

Here’s Authorize.net’s e-mail to the gun store:

Dear Hyatt Gun Shop Inc,

Authorize.Net LLC (“Authorize.Net”) has determined that the nature of your business constitutes a violation of Section 2.xiv of the Authorize.Net Acceptable Use Guidelines and Sections 3.3 and 11.3 of the Authorize.Net Service Agreement (the “Agreement”). These sections include, but are not limited to, the sale of firearms or any similar product. Accordingly, pursuant to Section 4 of the Acceptable Use Guidelines, your ability to access and use the Authorize.Net Services will be terminated on September 30, 2013.

Why are they just now deciding after all this time that Hyatt Gun Shop is in violation of their service agreement? The Washington Examiner reports:

The brushoff of Hyatt’s business has sparked a national boycott effort against Authorize.net and parent company CyberSource organized by the website Grass Roots North Carolina. “It looks like the small but noisy anti-gun crowd has gotten to what must be a jelly-spined PR department at CyberSource and Authorize.Net. Either that, or leadership at these companies have simply become anti-gun all on their own,” said the website in announcing the boycott. Anderson suspects that the company, purchased by Visa in 2010, got cold feet dealing with a leading gun seller and he said that he’s heard of other gun stores being dropped. The company had no immediate comment.

Every time a shooting occurs, some gun shop ends up getting shafted or some TV network decides to drop all gun and ammo advertisers. I guess they’re just doing their part to end “gun violence.”