De Blasio Advisor Dating a Convicted Killer

A “top” Bill de Blasio advisor is living with a man who was convicted of homicide, has a record for cocaine trafficking, and was charged with disorderly conduct for trying to run over a police officer—whom, the evidence shows, he likes to call “pigs.”

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Why does this make perfect sense?

Here are the facts reported by the New York Post: “Top adviser to de Blasio dates a cop-bashing killer.”

A top adviser to Mayor Bill de Blasio is in a live-in relationship with a convicted killer and drug trafficker who considers police officers “pigs” and continues to get into serious scrapes with the law, public records show.

For six years, Rachel Noerdlinger , who serves as chief of staff to first lady Chirlane McCray, has been living with boyfriend Hassaun McFarlan, sources told The Post.

While McCray, accompanied by Noerdlinger, enjoys attending high-level NYPD CompStat meetings, her top aide’s boyfriend has plenty of serious crime stats of his own — a rap sheet that includes homicide, conspiring to run a cocaine operation, and nearly running a cop off the road in Edgewater, NJ, last year in an incident that was later pleaded down to disorderly conduct.

Still, the administration is sticking by him, despite what DNAinfo.com, which broke the story, described as online posts — since taken down — in which he repeatedly called cops “pigs.”

“Rachel’s not going anywhere,” de Blasio spokeswoman Rebecca Katz said when asked if Noerdlinger would be asked to step down.

While I’m sure there are many individualized factors that make this relationship “work,” simply knowing that one of them is ruling class and the other is a habitual criminal tells us that they have an immediate affinity to one another.

I’m not referring to money because the story doesn’t mention a financial arrangement. It is true that politicians and criminals have a shared economic incentive to work together. The criminal can work out a lucrative illegal enterprise and the politician can protect him from law enforcement. In fact, it is even more perverse than that: the politician can give the favored criminal a protected monopoly by vigorously enforcing the law for other criminals. The politician gets a cut of easy and untraceable money and the criminal gets protection from prosecution and from competition.

But this story seems to indicate a personal affinity. So what’s going on?

All you have to do is look at de Blasio’s behavior. Obviously, people like him and those around him think they are special. They are above the rules the normal people are supposed to follow. They are above the law. They don’t get paid what customers are willing to give them in exchange for goods and services; they get paid from coerced taxes.

So with that mindset, naturally such people will be drawn to other lawless criminals. And sometimes these lawless criminals won’t be the ones who work in politics. McFarlen obviously doesn’t see himself as bound by the rules that restrain other people. Naturally, this puts him in the same league as a political advisor for New York City’s mayor.

It’s a match made in Hell.