French Flee Socialism. How Long before a U.S. Exodus?

The numbers of expatriates in London and elsewhere are growing as the French flee socialism.

french socialism

While we typically think of the French as “more socialist” than Americans, we need to remember that we are characterizing an entire nation of people. There are plenty of French men and women who hate socialism and are simply trapped by it, just like we are.

Thus, record numbers of the French are leaving their homeland. As the Independent reports: “French say au revoir to France: Over two million French people now live abroad, and most are crossing the channel and heading to London.”

A French parliamentary commission of inquiry is due to publish its report on emigration on Tuesday, but Le Figaro reported yesterday that because of a political dispute among its members over the reasons for the exodus, a “counter-report” by the opposition right-wing is to be released as an annex.

Centre-right deputies are convinced that the people who are the “lifeblood” of France are leaving because of “the impression that it’s impossible to succeed”, said Luc Chatel, secretary general of the UMP, who chaired the commission.

There is “an anti-work mentality, absurd fiscal pressure, a lack of promotion prospects, and the burden of debt hanging over future generations,” he told Le Figaro. However, the report’s author Yann Galut, a Socialist deputy, said the UMP was unhappy because it had been unable to prove that a “massive exile” had taken place since the election of President François Hollande in 2012.

What is certain is the steady rise in the number of emigrants across all sections of society, from young people looking for jobs to entrepreneurs to pensioners.

According to a French Foreign Ministry report published at the end of last month, the top five destinations are the UK, Switzerland, the US, Belgium and Germany. The French consulate in London has estimated that up to 400,000 French nationals live in the capital, a number equal to the population of France’s sixth largest city.

The Foreign Ministry recorded 1.6 million expats at the end of last year. But that figure only includes people who had registered at French consulates abroad. “So the real figure is twice as high,” says Hélène Charveriat, the delegate-general of the Union of French Citizens Abroad.

She told The Independent that while the figure of 2.5 million expatriates is “not enormous”, what is more troubling is the increase of about 2 per cent each year.

“Young people feel stuck, and they want interesting jobs. Businessmen say the labour code is complex and they’re taxed even before they start working. Pensioners can also pay less tax abroad,” she says.

How long before we start seeing Americans do this? Right now most of the noise is about “corporate inversions” where a company gets acquired by a group in a foreign country with a lower corporate tax burden.

But eventually it won’t just be companies: Americans will find life more bearable if they can find a lower tax burden in another country.