Global Warming: Why The Red Alert Button Is Too Easy to Push

From the Wall Street Journal:

The United Nations’ Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change will shortly publish the second part of its latest report, on the likely impact of climate change. Government representatives are meeting with scientists in Japan to sex up—sorry, rewrite—a summary of the scientists’ accounts of storms, droughts and diseases to come. But the actual report, known as AR5-WGII, is less frightening than its predecessor seven years ago.

The 2007 report was riddled with errors about Himalayan glaciers, the Amazon rain forest, African agriculture, water shortages and other matters, all of which erred in the direction of alarm. This led to a critical appraisal of the report-writing process from a council of national science academies, some of whose recommendations were simply ignored.

Others, however, hit home. According to leaks, this time the full report is much more cautious and vague about worsening cyclones, changes in rainfall, climate-change refugees, and the overall cost of global warming.

It puts the overall cost at less than 2% of GDP for a 2.5 degrees Centigrade (or 4.5 degrees Fahrenheit) temperature increase during this century. This is vastly less than the much heralded prediction of Lord Stern, who said climate change would cost 5%-20% of world GDP in his influential 2006 report for the British government.

There are all kinds of incentives for scientists to “sound the alarm” on whatever the latest “big thing” is, and there are plenty of ideologues (Al Gore, Barack Obama, Harry Reid, etc.) who see opportunities for increased power and plunder in rushing to the rescue.

Maybe it’s time we stopped being so enamored with crises, and opportunities to “save the world.” The reality is that life is typically a lot more “boring” and non-sensational. While some things do require action, for the most part we should devote our lives to the simple compassions of serving our community, providing for our family and teaching our children, and loving our neighbors who have needs.

Almost every global environmental scare of the past half century proved exaggerated including the population “bomb,” pesticides, acid rain, the ozone hole, falling sperm counts, genetically engineered crops and killer bees. In every case, institutional scientists gained a lot of funding from the scare and then quietly converged on the view that the problem was much more moderate than the extreme voices had argued. Global warming is no different.