IRS Agents Are a Disease

Here is an outrageous article about IRS agents and their evil deeds in the New York Times: “Law Lets I.R.S. Seize Accounts on Suspicion, No Crime Required.”

IRS sign 2

The title says it all.

For almost 40 years, Carole Hinders has dished out Mexican specialties at her modest cash-only restaurant. For just as long, she deposited the earnings at a small bank branch a block away — until last year, when two tax agents knocked on her door and informed her that they had seized her checking account, almost $33,000.

The Internal Revenue Service agents did not accuse Ms. Hinders of money laundering or cheating on her taxes — in fact, she has not been charged with any crime. Instead, the money was seized solely because she had deposited less than $10,000 at a time, which they viewed as an attempt to avoid triggering a required government report.

“How can this happen?” Ms. Hinders said in a recent interview. “Who takes your money before they prove that you’ve done anything wrong with it?”

The federal government does.

Using a law designed to catch drug traffickers, racketeers and terrorists by tracking their cash, the government has gone after run-of-the-mill business owners and wage earners without so much as an allegation that they have committed serious crimes. The government can take the money without ever filing a criminal complaint, and the owners are left to prove they are innocent. Many give up.

“They’re going after people who are really not criminals,” said David Smith, a former federal prosecutor who is now a forfeiture expert and lawyer in Virginia. “They’re middle-class citizens who have never had any trouble with the law.”

I am so tempted to use language I do not use with this one. The only way IRS agents can sleep at night is if they have no conscience.

[See also, “Civil Asset Forfeiture Makes Police into Organized Crime.”]

I dare say that “virus” is way past pandemic stage among Federal employees. It is just as deadly for the citizens they “serve” as Ebola.

I’d better stop now before I say something I’ll regret.