NC Wants to Punish People for Talking about Food and Health

The North Carolina legislature is about to prohibit us common people from talking about food and health because only doctors can be trusted.

You would think, with a presidential candidate using a non-FDA-approved diet, that this kind of thing would go away.

Instead, I think we are about to see many attempts to suppress people from taking care of their own health under the color of that euphemism for tyranny—“public health.”

Thomas Jefferson had it right: “Was the government to prescribe to us our medicine and diet, our bodies would be in such keeping as our souls are now.” I believe he was speaking in a context where he thought the souls of his time and place were languishing under tyranny. The quotation got paraphrased in the late nineties as: “If people let the government decide what foods they eat and what medicines they take, their bodies will soon be in as sorry a state as are the souls of those who live under tyranny.”

Someone in North Carolina wants that outcome and has enough influence to possibly make it happen. And you can’t assume that it will stay in North Carolina. Like Common Core, lobbyists are perfectly capable of going state by state with an anti-First-Amendment template for the legislatures to pass. If North Carolina sets a precedent it makes their job easier.

Robb Wolf writes:

Hey folks, I need to pass this along to you and I really hope you lend some muscle to shooting down the Bill HB 796, “Modernize Dietetics/Nutrition Practice Act.” In essence, HB 796 will prevent anyone from communicating dietary advice to a non-family member who has a medical condition. Friend of yours asks you how you lost weight? Can’t say anything, as obesity is a “medical condition.” Own a gym and want to do a Paleo Challenge? Good luck, the Dietetics Board of NC can, and likely will, sue you. If you check out that link to the Bill, scan down to the bottom, you will see what becomes illegal with the enactment of this Bill. At one point it was the “practice of dietetics” however that has been changed to “medical nutrition therapy.” Since life itself can be labeled a “medical condition” it provides a remarkably invasive reach for the The North Carolina Board of Dietetics/Nutrition.

You may remember that I posted about the evil Dietetics Board of North Carolina when they failed their attempt to stop Steve Cooksey from blogging and coaching people on the paleo diet.

Here’s the video if you want a quick reminder of what was going on:

In that case, the Dietetics Board backed down and re-wrote their own guidelines because they knew they couldn’t go up against the First Amendment. But now they are hoping the North Carolina legislator will provide them with cover.

There is a struggle emerging between the old guard of academia/medicine and the emergent, decentralized networks that provide arguably superior information. Academia clearly has it’s place, although I am continually pushed to define or understand exactly what that role is other than protecting hegemony. I put much more faith in markets, self-experimentation and outcome based medicine. That position absolutely FREAKS OUT anyone who is an entrenched academic. Well, tough. Dietetics, as it is currently practiced, is an appalling failure. An auto-mechanic who understands the rudiments of ancestral health is more valuable to our populace than 10,000 RD’s who promulgate the same tired crap. To some degree, this is exactly what is happening. The old guard is getting crushed in a market-based sharing of information and their only response is to make a political/legal power-grab. NOT change their broken, archaic methodology. Instead, they work to create a legal barrier that prevents people from sharing simple solutions to complex problems.

You only have to remind yourself of Michelle Obama’s starve-the-students lunch program to know that our government has dangerous ideas it wants to impose on us. But people are pushing back and educating themselves, even to the point of driving up the price of butter. As I wrote before:

And what about Michelle Obama? She said that moms were confused and bewildered in the grocery store so that they needed better guidance from food labels. But the market doesn’t show us noticeable confusion. It shows us people who disagree with her and who have, despite economic difficulties, expressed their preferences with their pocketbooks. Instead of the low-fat directions from the government, they are looking for sources of food that are high in fat.

But, of course, the bureaucrats want us confused and bewildered so they can “help us”—after they have made all the real help illegal.

If you live in North Carolina, please get involved in the fight for food freedom and free speech!