Paul Ryan Working On Immigration “Reform” With Chuck Schumer In “Private Talks”

Paul Ryan has to set the record for growing the horn out of his nose in the least amount of time. It is hard to believe that only in 2012 he was chosen to make Mitt Romney seem palatable to conservatives in the Republican Party. He has now fully metastasized into a RINO.

As someone recently remarked in the American Spectator,

one may be forgiven for wondering, what is Paul Ryan’s game plan? He recently negotiated away the automatic sequester cuts, one of the few real accomplishments of the House Republicans. And just last week he voted for the Farm Bill, which included hardly any of the fiscal reforms he sought previously. He had actually demanded ten times as much in cuts as was included in the legislation, an unholy amalgam of Republican farm subsidies and excessive Democratic food stamp spending. Truth be told, the former is more indefensible than the latter since the farm bill subsidizes Americans with an average income exceeding $100,000 per year.

But it keeps getting worse. Now, Politico.com reports that Paul Ryan has “held private talks” with Churck Schumer on immigration reform.

Schumer has been particularly busy. In 2013, the New York Democrat — who led immigration negotiations in the Senate — approached Ryan, a Wisconsin Republican, and the pair have met four times since then, according to multiple sources with knowledge of the talks. They spoke about other issues as well — ice fishing and Asian carp — but immigration reform was high on the docket.

There were no actual negotiations in the meetings, which have not been disclosed until now. Schumer prodded Ryan to chart a course forward.

Forward to what? Why is Paul Ryan getting selected, as he was with the budget deal, to work with Democrats.

Ryan makes noises like he is going to do something remotely conservative, but the evidence lately has been dismal. Politico.com tries to make Ryan’s attention to this issue seem reasonable. The talks “provide a window into the urgency — and high stakes — surrounding the immigration reform debate.”

What urgency?

For Republicans there is no urgency except for a great deal of opposition. The urgency is to fight Obamacare and get answers about the NSA, Benghazi, Fast and Furious, and the IRS scandal. Why is this taking up any Republican’s time or attention?

Yet, rather than defeating Democrats, Republicans are working hard to make the Democrats’ agenda look important to the nation. Thomas Sowell described our situation well:

Republicans may once again come to the rescue of the Democrats, by discrediting themselves and snatching defeat from the very jaws of victory.

The latest bright idea among Republicans inside the Beltway is a new version of amnesty that is virtually certain to lose votes among the Republican base and is unlikely to gain many votes among the Hispanics the Republican leadership is courting.

[…]

When it comes to national elections, just what principles do the Republicans stand for? It is hard to think of any, other than their hoping to win elections by converting themselves into Democrats lite. But voters who want what the Democrats offer can vote for the real thing, rather than Johnny-come-lately imitations.

Listening to discussions of immigration laws and proposals to reform them is like listening to something out of “Alice in Wonderland.”

Sowell is absolutely right. And Paul Ryan seems to be the leader in the Republican suicide mission.