Product Placement In Common Core? Repaying the Corporate Backers?

So, some of the biggest corporations in the world are behind so-called “Common Core”… and big political dynasties like the Bushes… what could possibly be wrong with that?

Every time I heard one of the disingenuous ads on the radio supporting this monstrosity my spirit said: “Yeah, and what’s the real agenda? Because the entities behind this don’t spend that much money without a big, long-term payoff.”

Well, here’s just a taste… today’s test brought to you by…

From MSN News: “Brand names in NY standardized tests vex parents.”

Brands including Barbie, iPod, Mug Root Beer and Life Savers showed up on the tests more than a million students in grades 3 through 8 took this month, leading to speculation it was some form of product placement advertising.

New York state education officials and the test publisher say the brand references were not paid product placement but just happened to be contained in previously published passages selected for the tests.

Some critics aren’t so sure and questioned why specific brand names would be mentioned at all.

“It just seems so unnecessary,” said Josh Golin, associate director of the Campaign for a Commercial-Free Childhood, which monitors marketing directed at children.

“It would be horrible if they were getting paid for it,” he said. “But even if they’re not, it’s taking something that should not be a commercial experience and commercializing it.”

The test questions have not been made public, and teachers and principals are barred from discussing them. But teachers posting anonymously on education blogs have complained that students were confused by the brand names, which were accompanied by trademark symbols.

The Nike question was about being a risk taker and included the line, “‘Just Do It’ is a registered trademark of Nike,” according to students who took the test.

Sam Pirozzolo, of Staten Island, whose fifth-grader encountered the Nike question, said there was apparently no reason for such a specific brand.

“I’m sure they could have used a historical figure who took risks and invented things,” Pirozzolo said. “I’m sure they could have found something other than Nike to express their point.”

Deborah Poppe, of West Hempstead, Long Island, said her eighth-grade son was similarly puzzled by a question, which drew complaints for a second straight year, about a busboy who failed to clean some spilled root beer — Mug Root Beer, to be exact, a registered trademark of PepsiCo.

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