State Now Strips Drivers of License if They Skip School

Nevada has a new law that takes away the right to drive if drivers skip school.

School buses

As you may or may now know, there was a time when there was no public school in this country. There were no truancy laws and there was, thus, no such thing as a truancy officer.

And the United States was overwhelmingly a literate country. People learned their basic reading and math despite being free to remain ignorant. People took care for themselves and/or their children to get educated without being forced to do so by legislators or governors.

I am not making this up.

So now we have truancy laws and officers and yet we have illiteracy and ignorance.

But that was not enough for the Nevada legislature. KMOV.com reports:

If a student has too many unexcused absences, his or her driver’s license will be taken away for 30 days on first offense and 60 on second. If a student has yet to obtain a license and has numerous unexcused absences, that student won’t be able to get one until the situation is rectified.

SB 269 will take effect Thursday. It’s designed to ensure students are in classrooms at least 90 percent of the school year.

Students will have to print a form available on the Department of Motor Vehicles’ website which their respective schools will sign off on. Only then will they be able to obtain a license.

In the event a student has too many unexcused absences, a truancy officer will confiscate that student’s license and mail it to the Department of Motor Vehicles.

If a student breaks the rules a third time, he or she will have to become compliant and repeat all the steps needed to obtain a driver’s license, including having a picture taken.

David Fierro with the Department of Motor Vehicles said that other than creating the aforementioned form, his office has had no formal discussions with the Clark County School District about enforcement.

The pretense that this law is for the good of students is delusional. School funding depends on students attending school. This is a gift for teachers and superintendents and their budgets.

[See also, “School Fight! The Way Of Peace Is To Let Go.”]

A student cannot get a driver’s license until he is sixteen. If you think that, at the age of sixteen, you can force a teenager who has grown so alienated from school, to suddenly benefit from time in the classroom, you don’t understand human development. A person like that being dragged back to the classroom and forced to sit there until he graduates is simply marking time.

Such a person might be better off holding a job—something that will be hard to do if his ability to drive is taken away.

I understand that people want to rescue teens that seem to be sabotaging their futures. Humans often do that to themselves. But there is no reason to think this law actually rescues anyone from missing an education.