The ACLU Attack on Religious Freedom Defies Logic

Because it is a group that can only survive by demanding ideological conformity of its members, the ACLU attack on Christian organizations is hypocritical.

Carson Halloway is absolutely right: “The ACLU’s Hypocritical Defense of Laws That Violate Religious Liberty.”

One of the great ironies of our politics is that the American Civil Liberties Union is now actually hostile to traditional American civil liberties.

This is the conclusion one must draw from a letter the organization has sent to the House of Representatives, seeking to defend two District of Columbia laws that, under the guise of enforcing non-discrimination, undermine the First Amendment rights of private organizations.

Essentially, the ACLU seeks to defend regulations that require religious universities to provide their facilities for the use of student LGBT advocacy groups and that forbid religious organizations from firing employees whose personal conduct violates the morality to which the organizations are dedicated.

As I explain at greater length at Public Discourse, the ACLU’s zeal for “non-discrimination” here directly infringes on not just one but two fundamental constitutional freedoms—freedoms that the ACLU was originally founded to protect.

Religious Liberty is a cornerstone of America’s unique place in world history. The gloves are obviously off, now that anti-religionists sense the balance of power in the nation has radically shifted toward unbelief. What they fail to consider is that America will not be America once protections for freedom of religion and conscience are removed. Today the target is sincere Christians, but once you allow men to coerce others using the force of government, the targeting never stops, it just moves from one “out of favor” group to another.

It is impossible for individuals to freely exercise their religion without permitting them to join into associations for that purpose. And such associations are rendered effectively useless if they must employ and otherwise work with people hostile to their purposes.

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Neither the ACLU nor its allies could carry on their political and legal activism if the law could require them to employ people opposed to their purposes. To the extent that the ACLU wants this freedom for itself, it should respect it in others as well. This is the American way.

If we abandon religious freedom no one will be safe. No one.